Barcelona apartments for rent- Holiday apartments in Barcelona Accommodation in Barcelona

ANOTHER WAY TO DISCOVER BARCELONA
Barcelona apartments
Rent apartment in Barcelona Advanced search Barcelona apartments Info owners About us
EspañolEnglishFrançaisItaliano
Districts of Barcelona
Raval
Barri Gòtic
Born
Barceloneta
Eixample
Vila Olímpica - St. Martí
Poble Sec – Montjuïc
Sants - Les Corts
Gràcia - St. Gervasi
Horta - St. Andreu

Raval
The rough and bawdy Raval is one of Barcelona's least-known areas, off the tourist track, a cauldron filled with some of the city’s most varied and colourful sites and sociology. Traversed by all manner of spectacle, this area is in constant urban and cultural transformation and its peculiar mixture causes the interest and the admiration of all.
The Raval lies to the letf of La Rambla, the most famous street in Barcelona that traverses the old town towards the sea. Lively throughout the day and night -both during summertime and wintertime- the Rambla features lots of unique street performers ranging from surreal human statues and card tricksters to talented artists and musicians.
In the up-and-coming Raval district you will find an ever-expanding range of trendy bars and restaurants and some of the most ancient and famous buildings of Barcelona such as the modern art museum (MACBA), the National Library of Catalonia and the Palau Güell, declared by UNESCO in 1984 a world-heritage building.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Barri Gòtic
The Barri Gòtic is the oldest part of the city, the seat of government for the Romans. Barcelona’s earliest history unfolded within the original walls surrounding this small piece of high ground. This old district made of narrow and pedestrians-only streets and squares is full of character and charm and is home to hundreds of shops, bars and restaurants.
The Gothic Quarter lies to the left of La Rambla, the most famous street in Barcelona “that traverses the old town towards the sea”.
Lively throughout the day and night –both during summertime and wintertime--the Rambla features lots of unique street performers ranging from surreal human statues and card tricksters to talented artists and musicians. The Barri Gotic area is a picturesque and popular neighbourhood where you will find the Portal de L'Angel, a modern shopping street that leads to the traffic-free square dominated by the Cathedral and the Roman walls that once closed the city of Barcelona. From there you may walk to Plaça del Rei, site of important Gothic buildings that evidence the important cultural role played by Barcelona during the Middle Ages. The City History museum in that square could lead you to the Roman remains just beneath that square.
On the south side of the Gothic Quarter is the Plaça Real, a palm-lined square whose bars and restaurants around each side are a relaxing place to stop and watch life during the day and at night when the square becomes a hive of activity.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Born
The Born was the old waterfront neighbourhood.
El Born has been transformed in recent years to become one of the trendiest neighbourhoods of Barcelona. Its old streets are bursting with chic tapas and cocktail bars, candlelit restaurants and fashion boutiques. The area borders the port and the nice beaches of the Barceloneta, the Gothic Quarter, where you will find the cathedral and the outstanding Rambla, and the Ciutadella Park, where you may stay in the shade beneath a tree.
The neighbourhood contains possibly the most disparate aesthetic extremes Barcelona has to offer: on one hand the Moderniste Palau de la Música concert hall, a jewel of Modernism declared world-heritage site by UNESCO in 1997, and on the other hand the imposing Santa Maria del Mar church, a building of extraordinary beauty and one of the finest examples of Catalan Gothic architecture.
This district is thick with some of the city’s smallest and most medieval streets and alleys. One of them is Carrer Montcada, an elegant street dating back to the Barcelona of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, which retains a great number of palaces including the well-known Museu Picasso.
Another interesting architectural piece is the old Born market, an extraordinary wrought-iron structure, built in 1874 and refurbished in 2002. During its latest renovation workers had a great surprise, as they discovered under the ground the extremely well preserved remains of an old section of the Born district that date back to the early eighteenth century.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Barceloneta
In the midle eighteen century Barcelona took some land to the sea and constructed a new neighbourhood that has been the fishermen’s district of the city: the Barceloneta.
The Barceloneta area is a picturesque and working-class neighbourhood with narrow streets crossing each other in a rectangular fashion and with plenty of laundry hanging out to dry between balconies full of flowers.
The location of this district facing the sea turns it into a lovely spot to visit. Here is where the city of Barcelona and its beaches meet together.
From there it just takes you a nice and peaceful stroll along the waterfront to reach the Rambla and the statue of Columbus. It is placed just a few minutes from the Old Town, the Gothic Quarter and the city cathedral.
This area boasts some of the best seafood restaurants in town and a long sandy beach which is popular all year round but specially in summertime, when the beach bars called “chiringuitos” open up.
On the other side of the Barceloneta lies the old port that still preserves the fishing area, with the clock tower where the fishermen used to sell their fish. Next to it, overlooking the marina, you will find the impressive Catalan History Museum with a row of upmarket fish and paella restaurants beneath which have one of the best locations in town. In the middle of the port you can find the modern Mare magnum complex with shops, bars, restaurants and one of the largest aquariums in Europe.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Eixample
The Eixample district features the central Modernist architecture area for which Barcelona is so world famous. This is the true, modern central area in Barcelona, and from this location you can get easily everywhere in the city on foot or in public transport in the worst cases. In addition to the strong cultural sights in this area, there are also a number of stores such as municipal markets, supermarkets, designer shops and boutiques, as well as a number of outstanding Barcelona restaurants and tapas bars.
The Eixample, which literally means “widening” or “broadening out”, is the early twentieth-century Modernist residential and commercial area with its famous grid system of straight streets designed to accommodate the old city´s swelling population. Barcelona’s late nineteenth-century explosion of Art Nouveau, locally called Modernisme, found its home in the Eixample, today virtually a living museum of art and architecture. Splashed with color and form, the Eixample reflects the ambition and the taste, the grandeur and the grandiloquence of the turn-of-the-century Barcelona bourgeoisie. The quantity and the varieties of the architectural expression of Modernisme in the Eixample are nearly infinite. The façades, the stores and pharmacies, the “porteries” or entryways, the inner courtyards, the passageways and the sculptures are all worthy of monographic studies.
Its main avenue, Passeig de Gràcia, is considered to be one of Europe’s most beautiful avenues. In this street we find one of the two Eixample buildings declared world-heritage site by UNESCO in 1984: Antoni Gaudi’s La Pedrera. The other one is the Sant Pau hospital (declared world-heritage site in 1997), near Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia church.
The Eixample is generally referred to in terms of Eixample Esquerre (the area lying on the left side of Passeig de Gràcia) and Eixample Dret (the area lying on the right side of Passeig de Gràcia). Gaudi´s iconic Sagrada Familia cathedral stands on the right side. The Fundacio Antoni Tapies, whose pioneering Islamic-inspired building hosts important temporary modern art exhibits, lies on the left.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Vila Olímpica - St. Martí
Sant Martí was the main industrial quarter of Barcelona throughout the ninenteenth century, but over the past two decades this area has enjoyed an important touristic and economic transformation since it regained for public use nearly three miles of sandy beaches. One of the most noticeable examples of this transformation is the Olympic Village. During the Olympic Games of 1992 the village had to accommodate thousands of athletes and spectators. For this purpose architects from all over the world designed modern and striking buildings. The main eye-catching sights are the two 142-meter high tower buildings, which house a hotel and an office building. Right across those buildings stands the golden sculpture ‘Peix i Esfera’, designed by Frank Gehry, representing a headless fish.
This area has many advantages as a place to stay in Barcelona. It is a quiet, relaxing area, and it has the beach and a promenade featuring nice views of the Mediterranean. This is a very lively neighborhood with lots of trendy restaurants and bars, especially in the evening.
The Olympic harbour is one of Barcelona's most popular all-day attractions where visitors can also practise water sports.
The area is well communicated, within five minutes by bus or metro you can reach the city center and/or the Gothic Quarter, where you can visit the Cathedral, the Picasso Museum, Santa Maria del Mar church and the famous Rambla. If you would like to see the renowned Sagrada Familia – Gaudi´s unfinished masterpiece--there is a direct bus route that leaves from the area (number 10), which will take you there within 10 minutes.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Poble Sec – Montjuïc
The district Poble Sec lies on the border of Montjüic hill, the backdrop of the World Exposition which took place in Barcelona in 1929 and the Olympic Games in 1992.
The most famous street in this district is, Avinguda Paral.lel, which was once the prime centre of Barcelona nightlife - often called the ´Montmartre´ of Barcelona. During the first half of the 20th century, this was Barcelona's area of theatres, nightclubs and music halls.
Today Poble Sec continues to enjoy a friendly atmosphere with quiet streets and parks and you can still find some traditional bars, some more modernized and various good restaurants. You will also notice some modernist buildings along Avinguida Paral.lel that stand out.
Poble Sec is also the area with the easiest access to parc Montjüic where you can enjoy spectacular views of Barcelona. Because of the world fair in 1929 in this mountain were built parks, palaces, pavilions, sports stadiums and exhibition halls were built in that hill. Some of those buildings remained, and house some important museums, or were renovated to accommodate sports activities during the Olympic games of 1992.
Among those builgings we “destacamos”, the Palau Nacional housing the Museu Nacional d'Art Catalunya (Medieval art), the 'Mies van der Rohe pavilion' of the world fair, the “magic fountain” colorfully with music at night, the Olympic stadium and the futuristic Palau d'esports San Jordi where lots of events and concerts are held.
The top of parc Montjuich contains one of the most disparate esthetic extremes that Barcelona has to offer: the 18th century castle with his Military Museum and the Fundació Joan Miró where paintings, sculptures and tapestries of Miro are displayed in a fantastic building.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Sants - Les Corts
Sants and Les Corts were once two independent village in the in the southwest of Barcelona and it became a part of the city in 1897. Those neighbourhoods began as a resting post for travelers heading into historic walled Barcelona where the city gates closed shortly after the dark.
Theses popular neighbourhoods have several shoping streets plenty of markets, supermarkets, shops, boutiques as well as a number of outstanding Barcelona restaurants and Tapas.
In that area you can join in the typical daily routine of the Barcelona locals without seeing tourists on every street corner as you may do in other parts of the city.
Its well communicated by metro and bus and within fifteen minutes you can get to Plaza Catalunya in Barcelona city center, La Ramblas, Passeig de Gracia (Gaudi buildings) and the Port area. It also is the area that has the best connections to the airport, by car, bus or train.
The places to visit in Sants are the Plaça d‘Espanya with its fountain display, the Espanya Industrial park and the adjacent Montjüic hill which once hold the World Exhibition in Barcelona in 1929 and the Olympic Games which were held in Barcelona in 1992and the Parc de l´Espaya Industrial.
In Les Corts you will find the Barcelona University Zone with its very nice atmosphere, the Pedralbes residential area, the Museum of Football and the famous Camp Nou stadium of Futbol Club Barcelona.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Gràcia - St. Gervasi
Gràcia and Sant Gervasi were once two independent villages and they became a part of the city of Barcelona in 1897. Gracia is a popular neibourhood while Sant Gevasi is more residential.
During the Franco years, Gracia was a hotbed of anarchist revolt and today, despite the pretty streets of old balcony-fronted houses and peaceful squares, this quiet neighbourhood retains its political fighting spirit as a source of many protests and rallies. Gràcia today has a bohemian and liberal flavour and attracts a young crowd to its many lively and trendy bars in squares such as the Plaza del Sol and the pretty Plaza de la Virreina. Throughout the year it is very popular for going out at night but every August the neighbourhood is host to a colourful and lively street festival, the Festa Mayor.
Gracia is home to a large number of student residents, a sizeable Catalan-speaking community, and a substantial community of artists, actors, musicians, photographers and designers, all of whom contribute to its bohemian flavour. With its tiny streets and thickly florewed windows and balconies, those romantic enclaves seems to bring together all of Barcelona’s passion and energy.
In the notheast of that area you will find one of the most beautiful places in Barcelona: the Parc Güell. It is another wonderful Gaudi project, declared by UNESCO in 1984 a world-heritage building, des d'on you will have a beautiful view over the city.
Though it feels pleasantly detached from the noise and crowds of the city centre this area is just a few stops by metro to the Gothic Quarter in the historical city center.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon





Horta - St. Andreu
Horta and Sant Andreu were once two independent villages and they became a part of the city in the begining of the 20th century.
The area offers a great variety of different facets. You find the narrow pedestrian streets of the former village Horta, wealthy country houses from the 19th centuries, there are hills and mountains from which you have a beautiful view over Barcelona and also the modern neighborhood of Vall d'Hebron that was build for the Olympic Games when they took place in Barcelona in 1992.
This area is less frequented by tourist than other district of Barcelona, but here you can enjoy the atmosphere of a true Spanish neighborhood or stroll through one of the parks you will find. The most famous park is the Labyrinth park which is set in a 17 acre garden on former private grounds of a marquis. Its romantic gardens, manicured walkways, and the labyrinth are well worth a visit to this romantic spot and are quite a a contrast to the busy city centre of Barcelona.

Best Barcelona City Guides from Amazon